Tuesday, April 06, 2010

video test

here's a test.. no sound on it yet.. quality is kind of messed up on it..
my friend used his digital camera to record me drawing.. more to come..

11 comments:

Aslan Jafari said...

quality is actually pretty good.
when you play the video, there is an option on the right bottom corner to switch between 360p and 480p =(better quality.

Rochelle said...

I thought you always used a reference for these sketches? Nice video!

chromasketch said...

aslan: cool!

rochelle: I do.. those were people standing in line for coffee... or sitting around

glauco.caon said...

Great one, chromasketch!
Thank you for posting the video.
It's really interesting to watch.
I'll probably rewatch later.

For now I realized your process has an intermediary speed (not fast neither slow); and that you really get that "Chinese painting" lines to begin working on the basic shapes (generally countour) of the figures.

I'm not sure right now, but did I figure out on those video sketches you always began by the head?

chromasketch said...

i think about 95% of the time i start on the head.. cause to me.. i want to see the head... but.. i think in some of the other video i may have not started on the head.. like once? or twice?

Henk said...

I love seeing this, your aproach makes so much more sense now, its great to see how slow you actually work. Judging by the lines I guessed you raced through these.

Henk said...

Slow isnt the exact word, its more calm and collected.

chromasketch said...

Henk: no prob.. i did some more videos... i think my drawing speed varies between as slow as this and a little faster.. I was making an effort to go slow, and not rush the video. i guess you'll see in the other ones.. more videos to come.

glauco.caon said...

Back in some years ago when I was learning 2d Animation fundamentals,
I've read a book named Animation: From Screen to Script, from Shamus Culnhein, an animator who worked at Disney in the middle of last century.

I've found valuable tips in that book that resulted in a big change in my way of thinking in Animation.
It's like, I was an amator one day, and something like 2 weeks later of intensive training in the method he presented, I was animating almost anything that I ever wanted to.

He wrote things like, the importance of beggining the drawing from the part where it has more energy and weight or action significance for the full composition. But of course I don't say it is absolutely decisive for the artwork quality, sometimes it also depends on the artist. But the most important thing he wrote I think was about a known exercise (based somehow in Kimon Nicolaides "The Natural Way of Drawing") where the artist had to draw imagination poses very very quiclky, like 1 full and correct rough pose in just about 30, 15, 10, 5 seconds...
Of course, the process is a bit different from observation to imagination drawings.
And you manage very well btw the sketches you make in that speed.
By seeing the video (and I know you said you did slower in it), I still thought it was much faster.

chromasketch said...

glauco.. i've heard of this technique as well... i heard it referred to as "overclocking" basically you train yourself by forcing yourself to go faster than you would normally have to.. then when you go back to normal speed.. it seems so much more slower..or easier... its an interesting technique.

glauco.caon said...

"Overclocking"?

I didn't know this word.
Thanks, it will help in my future researches.